How can you tell the difference between arterial and venous ulcers?

How can you tell the difference between arterial and venous ulcers?

In venous disease, ulcers are usually located in the gaiter area between the ankle and the calf, often on the medial aspect of the leg. Arterial leg ulcers occur as a result of reduced arterial blood flow and subsequent tissue perfusion.

Which symptom is noted with occlusive arterial disease?

Sudden, complete blockage of an artery in a leg or an arm may cause severe pain, coldness, and numbness in the affected limb. The person’s leg or arm is either pale or bluish (cyanotic). No pulse can be felt below the blockage. The sudden, drastic decrease in blood flow to the limb is a medical emergency.

What are the characteristics of an arterial ulcer?

Arterial ulcers are characterized by a punched-out look, usually round in shape, with well-defined, even wound margins. Arterial ulcers are often found between or on the tips of the toes, on the heels, on the outer ankle, or where there is pressure from walking or footwear.

How are arterial ulcers diagnosed?

Physical assessment should include both a general exam, looking for problems relating to lungs, heart and nervous system, and a focused exam of the affected extremities and arterial pulses. Vascular laboratory findings can also help confirm a diagnosis of arterial ischemic ulceration.

Can you use compression bandaging on arterial ulcers?

Compression bandaging must NEVER be used on arterial leg ulcers. Latex free brands of compression bandages should be used routinely. Compression bandaging should only be applied by staff with appropriate training and in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.

What is difference between PAD and PVD?

The two diseases differ in several key ways. PAD means you have narrowed or blocked arteries — the vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood as it moves away from your heart to other parts of your body. PVD, on the other hand, refers to problems with veins — the vessels that bring your blood back to your heart.

What are the 5 P’s of arterial occlusion?

Patients with an extremity embolus can frequently pinpoint the exact time that symptoms began. The six Ps (pain, pallor, poikilothermia, pulselessness, paresthesia, paralysis) are the classic presentation of acute arterial occlusion in patients without underlying occlusive vascular disease. (See ‘Six Ps’ below.)

What is the best treatment for arterial ulcers?

Treatment of arterial ulcers may involve surgical intervention for angioplasty, stenting, bypass grafting and, ultimately, amputation. Pain control is an important aspect of the management of arterial ulcers. Adequate analgesia is required to manage the severe ischaemic pain often experienced with arterial ulcers.

What is the best dressing for arterial ulcers?

Following assessment by a vascular specialist these ulcers may require debridement of dead, necrotic tissue, in which case gel dressings such as IntraSite* Gel are suggested. Allevyn Non-Adhesive is particularly useful for arterial ulcers to protect and assist to maintain a moist wound environment.

When should you not apply compression?

Severe pain or untreated pain. Treated deep vein thrombosis or phlebitis. If any of the following contraindications are present, compression therapy should be not be carried out: • Uncompensated organ failure (i.e., heart, liver, or renal). Untreated deep vein thrombosis or phlebitis.

Why is compression therapy not used for arterial ulceration?

With an ABPI >1.3, compression should be avoided because high ABPI values may be due to calcified and incompressible arteries. In such patients, a specialist vascular assessment should be sought. That compression therapy is the mainstay of management of leg ulcer is beyond doubt.

What are the 6 P of medicine?

The six P’s include: (1) Pain, (2) Poikilothermia, (3) Paresthesia, (4) Paralysis, (5) Pulselessness, and (6) Pallor. The earliest indicator of developing ACS is severe pain. Pulselessness, paresthesia, and complete paralysis are found in the late stage of ACS.

What are the 6 P’s of arterial occlusion?

The six Ps (pain, pallor, poikilothermia, pulselessness, paresthesia, paralysis) are the classic presentation of acute arterial occlusion in patients without underlying occlusive vascular disease.

How long does it take for an arterial ulcer to heal?

In most people such an injury will heal up without difficulty within a week or two. However, when there is an underlying problem the skin does not heal and the area of breakdown can increase in size.

Is compression good for arterial ulcers?

In patients with arterial leg ulcers, properly applied compression therapy using increased pressure over the wound may lead to an improvement of the arterial flow and to complete healing.